Words & Music

"Art is not what you see, but what you make others see." Edgar Degas

Monday, September 17, 2018

The Way Lovers Do


My lover was an ocean away from me when I wrote this song. The words and the melody all came together and I had to find their place on the guitar. Usually songs come the other way around for me, with a melody and rhythm looking for the words.

This one expresses a basic desire: to live the way lovers do.



Every woman I meet
I think
She thinks
She knows me at first sight
And every one is right
I’m like the night after a fight
I haven’t got a thing to hide
I told you I love you
I told myself that too
The way that lovers do
When every word is true
        I want to see you tonight
        The way lovers do
        I want to hear you tonight
        The way lovers do
        I want to touch you tonight
        The way lovers do
Every man I meet
I think
I think I know this guy
He used to live a lie
And back then so did I
I haven’t got a thing to hide
I told you I love you
I told myself that too
The way that lovers do
When every word is true
        I want to see you tonight
        The way lovers do
        I want to hear you tonight
        The way lovers do
        I want to touch you tonight
        The way lovers do

Friday, September 14, 2018

CitySketch: Trees



The trees of the city – not the ones in the parks but the ones in the sidewalks and courtyards, surrounded by concrete – watch over us the way our elders always have, with understanding and indulgence.

They say, “It is possible to survive even the strangulation of your roots.”

They say, “Make a home in me, little birds, and let your hatchlings grow here.”

They say, “Take some oxygen; it’s free.”

They say, “We are all going to die. It’s OK. We may all live again. Who’s to say?”
Thursday, September 13, 2018

CitySketch: Lamppost







There are 1,600 lampposts scattered across Central Park’s 843 acres. They were designed in 1980 by architects Gerald Allen and Kent Bloomer, to replace the original electric lamps that were designed in 1910 by Henry Bacon, architect of the Lincoln Memorial.

The Landmarks Commission held hearings to decide if the lamps would be of modern design or if they should continue the tradition of the original lamps, attempting to blend into the landscape. Those who favored the natural design proved more persuasive.

''The whole idea of the natural landscape reproduced in the man-made elements of the park was in the spirit of those times and is traceable to the 19th-century theoretician John Ruskin. The Bacon lamppost itself depicts seeds, leaves, stems and a trunk. The lamppost was a metaphor for a plant.'' Kent Bloomer

Fun fact: at the base of each lamp are four numbers. The first two are the nearest cross-street north to south and the last two let you know if you’re on the east or west side of the park. Even numbers are east and odd are west.